Archive for August, 2008

The Rising: Tia Lessin and Carl Deal’s “Trouble the Water”

by Michael Joshua Rowin (August 21, 2008)

“I’m showing the world that we had a world before the storm,” says Kimberly Rivers Roberts, a.k.a. Black Kold Madina, on August 28, 2005, the day preceding Hurricane Katrina’s devastating touch down in New Orleans. Kimberly is poor, black, and, unlike the majority of the city’s wealthier white citizens, unable to “afford the luxury” of transportation that could take her out of what will prove to be a very vulnerable Dodge. Armed with a newly purchased camcorder, she records and narrates her preparations for the storm as well as the ongoing life of her Ninth Ward community, including neighbors’ defying boasts in the face of reports warning residents to evacuate their homes due to the impending category-five hurricane.

Read the Full Story @ indieWIRE.com
< http://www.indiewire.com/movies/2008/08/review_the_risi.html >


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Tomb of the Mommy: Azazel Jacobs’s “Momma’s Man”

by Michael Koresky (August 18, 2008)

Considering that Azazel Jacobs, the director of “Momma’s Man,” is the offspring of American avant-garde filmmaker extraordinaire Ken Jacobs, one would be forgiven for expecting his film to be more experimental and abstract than the seemingly conventional narrative that plays out. Yet buried beneath the poignant clutter of this occasionally familiar stunted-youth-in-life-transition tale is a surprisingly complex, elegantly detailed meditation on creativity and artistic growth. While Ken Jacobs may work with found footage, purposefully elongating time and reassembling it into tapestries of pointed Americana, his son has constructed a personal fiction film using the detritus of his own life: the downtown Manhattan loft where he grew up, the gadgets and tchotchkes strewn about it like cherished memories, and his parents themselves.

Read the Full Story @ indieWIRE.com
< http://www.indiewire.com/movies/2008/08/review_tomb_of.html >


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“Patti Smith: Dream of Life” Director Steven Sebring

by indieWIRE (August 5, 2008)

EDITORS NOTE: This interview was originally published during “Patti Smith: Dream of Life”‘s premiere at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival

Celebrity photographer Steven Sebring’s feature directorial debut “Patti Smith: Dream of Life” is described by the Sundance Film Festival as a “hypnotic plunge, a breathing collage of this legendary musician/poet/painter/activist’s philosophy and artistry that feels as if it sprang directly from her soul.” 12 years in the making, “Dream of Life” examines Smith’s “interior terrain,” the ideas, losses and memories she wrestles with in addition to tracing her outward adventures. The film utilizes music, narration, graveyard pilgrimages, performance, political rallies, archival footage and verite moments with her working-class parents, children and friends to examine this punk pioneer. The film opens at the Film Forum in New York this Wednesday, August 6.

Read the Full Story @ indieWIRE.com
< http://www.indiewire.com/people/2008/08/indiewire_nterv.html >


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Quote of the day

“Acting is not the memorizing of a text while wearing a disguise, nor the facility to simulate anything at a moments notice, but the reconstruction of motives that are the cause of action and words.  This is not easy, easy though it may be for the actor to forget his own suffering by shouldering that of another.  At his best he is not only an interpreter, not only a carrier of ideas originating in others, but can invest his impersonation with a depth of understanding beyond the playwright’s knowledge.  He can be a superb mechanic and take the written word plus the director’s instructions to combine the two with the components of his own person, and thus give fluency and cohesion to thoughts that would not float over the footlights without his skill.  He can impress us with the meaning of the simplest word though we may have heard it a thousand times before without recognizing its significance.  It is not when he spouts Shakespeare without slurring a syllable that he wins his spurs, not when he has absorbed Kabuki or Stanislavsky in order to read a television commercial, but when he has learned to muffle his flamboyance, and so to control what he does that he can combine both actor and commentator.  He then can make us feel compassion, not for himself but for the one whose history we witness.”

-Josef Von Sternberg


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